Question: Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

Cards Against Muggles is mirrored on the infamous Cards Against Humanity expansion packs, and much like the original, the Harry Potter version tackles a lot of NSFW topics. The game is strictly for adult players only, so trust me, you wouldnt want to take it out in any family gatherings.

Are cards against Muggles licensed?

Cards Against Muggles is a must-have stocking filler for 2019. ... This obviously isnt an officially licensed game, and I cant imagine J.K. Rowling would be too impressed with Cards Against Muggles, but its all a bit of fun. Its definitely a case of mischief managed with the glorious set of magical cards.

Can kids play cards against muggles?

As you might imagine, the Muggles against Humanity set does have an age rating and restriction. This set is recommended for individuals who are 17 years of age or older due to the inappropriate and often sexual themes used on the cards.

How many versions are there of Cards Against Humanity?

There are currently four versions of the base game set: the original American one, then three regional variations for the UK, Canada and Australia and New Zealand. These variations swap out some cards for references that have more relevance to the local market.

How do you play cards against muggles?

The black cards are placed in a pile. The game begins when the first player draws a black card from the deck and reads it aloud. Each player (excluding the reader) then chooses a white card to answer the question or fill in the blank. The reader then reads everyones selections and chooses their favorite as the winner!

What is the difference between cards against Muggles and cards against Potter?

Cards Against Muggles is mirrored on the infamous Cards Against Humanity expansion packs, and much like the original, the Harry Potter version tackles a lot of NSFW topics. The game is strictly for adult players only, so trust me, you wouldnt want to take it out in any family gatherings.

What is the difference between Cards Against Muggles and cards against Potter?

Cards Against Muggles is mirrored on the infamous Cards Against Humanity expansion packs, and much like the original, the Harry Potter version tackles a lot of NSFW topics. The game is strictly for adult players only, so trust me, you wouldnt want to take it out in any family gatherings.

What happens if a Muggle finds Hogwarts?

imaginative. Wizarding society is kept hidden from Muggle society through a vast and complex range of concealment charms. If a Muggle were to look at Hogwarts, for example, all they would see is a ruin with signs telling them to keep out.

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Golden Son continues the stunning saga of Darrow, a rebel forged by tragedy, battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. On virtually every level, this is a sequel that hates sequels—a perfect fit for a hero who already defies the tropes. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. And so Darrow sacrifices himself in the name of the greater good for which Eo, his true love and inspiration, laid down her own life.

He becomes a Gold, infiltrating their privileged realm so that he can destroy it from within. A lamb among wolves in a cruel world, Darrow finds friendship, respect, and even love—but also the wrath of powerful rivals. He must live for more. Comparisons to The Hunger Games and Game of Thrones series are inevitable, for Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? tale has elements of both. Every action seems to flow into the next.

In Golden Son there is no shortage of deception or heroics and the action never wanes. There is no second book slump here, instead Brown amps up the tension by putting Darrow into ever greater physical and emotional conflict. Just like Red Risingthe first book in Brown's series, the end of Golden Son has me counting the days until the next and final book is released.

Both author and lead character have cranked up the emotional stakes. On virtually every level, this is a sequel that hates sequels—a perfect fit for a hero who already defies the tropes. Comparisons to The Hunger Games and Game of Thrones series are inevitable, for this tale has elements of both.

Every action seems to flow into the next. In a word, Golden Son is stunning. As great as the first book of the Red Rising Trilogy is, Golden Son is even better.

Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

Red Rising ascends above a crowded dystopian field. His work has been published in thirty-three languages and thirty-five territories. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is at work on his next novel. I stand on the bridge of my starship, arm broken and held in a gelcast, ion burns still raw on my neck. My razor coils around my good right arm like a cold metal snake. Before me, space opens, vast and terrible.

Small fragments of light prick the darkness, and primordial shadows move to block those stars on the fringes of my vision. They float slowly around my man-­of-­war, Quietus, as I search the blackness for my quarry. Win at the Academy and you earn yourself a fleet. Tall and broad in the shoulders. My uniform, all sable, now wrinkled. Hair long and eyes Golden, bloodshot. Mustang once said I have a sharp face, with cheeks and nose seemingly carved from angry marble.

Better to forget the mask I wear, the mask that bears the angled scar of the Golds who rule the worlds from Mercury to Pluto. I am of the Peerless Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?. Cruelest and brightest of all humankind. But I miss the kindest of them. The one who asked me to stay as I bid her and Mars goodbye on her balcony almost a year ago. I gave her a horse-­crested gold ring as a parting gift, and she gave me a razor. The taste of her tears grows stale in memory.

I have not heard from her since I left Mars. Dancer said he would contact me once I graduated, but I have been cast adrift among a sea of Golden faces. This is so far from the future I imagined for myself as a boy. So far from the future I wanted to make for my people when I let the Sons carve me. I thought I would change the worlds.

Instead, I have been swallowed by the machine of this vast empire as it rumbles inexorably on. At the Institute, they trained us to survive and conquer. Here at the Academy they taught us war. Now they test our fluency. I lead a fleet of warships against other Golds. We fight with dummy munitions and launch raiding parties from ship to ship in the way of Gold astral combat. No reason to break a ship that costs the gross yearly output of twenty cities when you can send leechCraft packed with Obsidians, Golds, and Grays to seize her vital organs and make her your prize.

Amid lessons of astral combat, our teachers hammered in the maxims of their race. And then they left and let us fend for ourselves, jumping asteroid to asteroid, searching for supplies, bases, hunting our fellow students till only two fleets remain.

This is just the deadliest yet. Killing in space is different from killing on land. Roque is a prodigy at it. Poetry to the motion of the spheres and the ships that sail between. His face fits with the Blues who crew these vessels—­airy men and women who drift like wayward spirits through the metal halls, all logic and strict order.

Force us into a choke point and release his missiles. Tried and true since the dawn of time. He leans his dangerous frame against the viewport and shoots a stim up his nose from the ring on his finger. He tosses the spent cartridge to the floor. Her jagged hair hangs just past ears pierced with jade. Her eyes are heavy, deeply set.

Her sensual mouth wide, with lips shaped to purr insults. She looks more like her famous mother than her younger half-sister, Antonia; but in her capacity for general mayhem she far outstrips both.

Hermione Granger

He has Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? one ship. How about we just bust his mouth? The point is the same, my goodman.

It would be embarrassing to let this drag out any longer. Thank you for noticing, Mommy dearest! But I grow weary of this military crank. I believe I desire Pearl clubs and copious amounts of respectable drugs. The quarry we chase is Karnus au Bellona, the older brother of my former friend, Cassius au Bellona, and the boy I killed in the Passage, Julian au Bellona.

Of that curly-­haired family, Cassius is the favorite son. Since the Institute, my celebrity has grown. The family wants my heart on a plate.

To attack me is to attack him. I want the fleet so I can Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

it for the Sons of Ares. What a mess I could cause. That is the simple fact of the matter. I only want to help. Blues of many shades toil there, working the Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? that run my ship. They speak more slowly than any other Color save Obsidian, favoring digital communication. They are older than I, graduates of the Midnight School, all.

Beyond them, near the back of the bridge, Gray marines and several Obsidians stand sentinel. I clap Roque on the shoulder. This is the final nail in the Bellona coffin. We put this bastard into the ether and I promise the greatest gift in my power to give—­a week of solid sleep.

The Blues just rap their knuckles on their instruments. He stands central in the pit Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? my command platform amid fifty others. Their eyes go distant as optic nerves revert to the digital world. They speak only out of courtesy to us. A fleet could hide on the other side Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? the asteroids. My warlords echo the phrase.

He spent his childhood building forts and setting traps for his cousins in the woods of six states and the deserts of two. He now lives in Los Angeles, where he scribbles tales of spaceships, wizards, ghouls, and most things old or bizarre. Keeping it cause I desperately need to know what happens.

The star rating does not reflect the story. It has been a long while since a book has made me raise my fist in triumph, pound it in anger, and cry tears of both sadness and joy; but here we have Golden Son. I cannot recommend this series enough. If you are a fan of Red Rising and have not yet picked up this sequel, you owe it to yourself to do so. Red Rising blew away my expectations in its pacing, its characterization, and the sheer amount of fun I had while reading it.

Golden Son had more to live up to, and again I was incredibly impressed. Even more fast-paced, even more gripping, even more brutal, the sequel is everything that Red Rising was and more. If you are on the fence about Pierce Brown go buy his books.

You will not regret it. Politics can be quite confusing, with that being said this book had a lot more political views and I found myself rereading passages to understand it better but one I did I found that the book was great. The war craft battles were exciting and epic. The insult are hilarious and I could not help laughing aloud getting strange looks from those around me. I felt like I was part of this world, this war, crying for people lost and yelling at other when they did some stupid.

I absolutely love Pierce Brown's writing and the amazing creations of this soon to be trilogy. I am unsure if I will be able to read another dystopian book without comparing it to Pierce Brown. I can't wait for the conclusion to come. Golden Son by Pierce Brown I loved the first installment of the Red Rising trilogy as a faithful recreation of a 1940s cheesy-pulp Space Opera. The story was an exciting, fast-paced Bildungsroman as Darrow, a Red youth, was transformed into a Gold superman. In this future, society is stratified into color-coded occupations with Gold at the top and Reds at the bottom.

Darrow is run through the survival of the fittest experience of the Institution where Gold youth murder, betray, enslave, and rape each other to win.

This book takes a step into space. Darrow is a lancer of House Augustus and he experiences failures. The pace of this book is fast. The action is in the edge of seat category. Fighting and action threads its way through this book. I thought that Brown's description of a space battle was intoxicating.

Behemoths of metal belch missiles back and forth, silently pounding one another with all the weapons of man.

The silence of it, so eerie, so strange. Great veils of flak explode around the ships, cloaking them in fury, almost like raw cotton tossed into the wind. RipWings and wasps buzz at one another, pissing streams of gunfire. They nip and slice at carapaces of metal, fighting in a dense giant cloud. In little packs they slip from their chaotic fights, spiraling silently toward clusters of leechCraft as the destroyers and carriers launch their troop transports across space in undulating waves.

Over, under, and through the curtains of flak the leeches go, seeking a hull to clamber onto so they can pump their deadly cargo into the belly of crucial ships, like flies dropping larvae into open wounds. All flown by Blues raised to do only this one thing. Bellona craft pass those of Augustus, waves overlapping, breaking on one another. I know that Blues can command fleets.

I know Obsidians can use technology, lead men. That the quickest Orange could, if given a proper chance, be a fine pilot. Reds could be soldiers, or musicians, or accountants. But I know what it would cost us. Order is paramount to our survival. Gold did not rise out of chance. We rose out of necessity. Out of chaos, born from a species that devoured its planet instead of investing in the future.

Pleasure over all, damn the consequences. The brightest minds enslaved to an economy that demanded toys instead of space exploration or technologies that could revolutionize our race.

Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

They created robots, neutering the work ethic of mankind, creating generations of entitled locusts. Countries hoarded their resources, suspicious of one another.

There grew to be twenty different factions with nuclear weapons. It was to save our race. The Colors are the spine of that aim. Allow the hierarchies to shift and the order begins to crumble. Mankind will not aspire to be great. Men will aspire to be great. Put that in the context of this speech, and you can see something underlying what would otherwise be merely another showpiece dystopia. There were features in the book, I didn't like. Darrow has a tendency to lapse into mordant self-abnegation where he blames himself for the deaths of friends.

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These moments are turned on and off for effect. Likewise, he has the magical ability to inspire loyalty at the drop of a hat, but this last trait is more than offset by the betrayals he experiences in this book.

This is the tent line between the first and last books. This book follows a chiastic structure: the low rise and high fall. This book follows the structure, but in this book, Darrow starts high and falls.

We see, therefore, that Darrow is not a Mary Sue character. Bad things happen to him. He has had a lot of lucky breaks, but there will come a time when luck and determination depart, and the hero is facing disaster, otherwise, things are too easy.

This is the book that tells that part of the epic. I look forward to seeing the rest of that story. But I kept on reading and it turned into something wonderful. Excellent characterization, good plot twists and strategy made it a joy to read.

And when I got to the end of book 2, I immediately went to order book 3 of the trilogy, only to find out I have to wait until February 2016. It seems forver to have to wait until Feb. All in all, I highly recommend the book s Having made it through the Institute and secured a patronage from one of the most powerful men on Mars, Darrow has continued his studies in warfare and leadership. This goes further afield than his own planet and includes commanding fleets of ships in epic space battles.

Where in Red Rising we were focused on just one tiny part of the universe Pierce Brown has created, in Golden Son we see much more of it. We also learn more about the structure of society and how it all fits together. Darrow in this book is conflicted, and this is reflected in the relationships he has with others. Constantly operating under the fear of being found out, he struggles to maintain friendships and build trust with those around him. While Darrow is a fascinating protagonist to read about, all of the secondary characters are also really well developed.

They all have their own motivations and stories, and they made this book feel real, rather than just a story. The whole book is one power play, battle or risk after another, which makes for a gripping read. I had a tough time when deciding how to rate this book because while there were so many great elements to it, I couldn't help but feel like I wasn't fully enjoying myself.

I mentioned in my review for 'Red Rising' that Pierce Brown's continuous use of short sentences irritated me, and that was present here in the second book also. I also found that he is unnecessarily dramatic and prone to repeating himself when revealing Darrow's inner thoughts to the reader.

Getting past that was difficult. That being said, there were so many things in this book that I loved and despite the fact that I had to read it in short spurts in order to get through it, they did a fantastic job of redeeming it. Firstly, Pierce Brown's world-building skills are just phenomenal.

He's clearly put a lot of thought into the whole universe, and not just Darrow's immediate surroundings.

The characters, as they were in 'Red Rising', were complex and each had succinct motivations. This is definitely a series where the books should be read in fairly quick succession, or the information and back-stories provided can become confusing.

Most of all though, I loved this book because of it's plot twists. Throughout the whole thing I was eyes-wide at the action, betrayals, battles and tense conversations happening before my eyes. If I was only a fan of the author's writing style, this book would have been a favourite of mine. Brown has also made his strictly stratified colour-coded world a very convincing and consistent one, which carries into the second book. There are a lot of exciting action scenes, but oh the gore!

I had to avert my eyes or close my kindle a couple of times because the violence was really graphic. Story-wise, there are enough developments and twists that follow through from the first book to keep the reader hooked, though the sheer number of characters and their ever-changing alliances can be confusing and hard to follow.

Darrow, the Red infiltrator of the Golds, has come a long way from his early days as a student playing war-games among the warring houses. He is now aligned to Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity? very Lord Augustus that had his wife Eo killed, and Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

head is being sought by House Bellona for the killing of one of its heirs, Julian, whom he had to battle to the death as part of his initiation into the twisted curriculum of the prestigious Gold academy. There is much to recommend in this exciting series, but I felt a little overwhelmed by the aforementioned gore and its huge case of characters.

I enjoyed the first book more, but this second ends on yet another cliffhanger which I feel reluctant to give up on and will be looking to read on the rest of the series. It's been a while since I've had a book that I couldn't put down as much as this one. Sure, every now and then I'll find a book I am eager to read each night, but to actively drop everything in life and solely commit to a book is much more uncommon.

I enjoyed Red Rising - I found it pleasantly clever, surprising and intriguing enough to make me purchase the second book - but the trilogy as a whole and my confidence in the author was still very much up for debate.

Golden Son has ended that debate. It is by far and away the better book, and for a sequel to be superior to the original is an incredibly rare thing indeed.

The chaos from the games has now spilled over into the wider world, and the stakes have never been higher. The enemies of Darrow's past still linger, are still threatening as he turns his sights to the Society itself.

As you will no doubt know from reading Red Rising, don't expect an easy ride and don't expect there to not be casualties. Pierce Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

has woven an incredible plot of love, betrayal and death. If you finished Red Rising and are debating whether it is worth continuing, I hope that this review, if nothing else, convinces you that yes, it absolutely is.

I don't know if I'm just not in the mood for this book at the moment, but despite its dramatic scope and personal tragedies I just wasn't that affected most of the time. As I complained with the first book, the writing style somehow holds me at a distance a lot of the time so I just don't get the feels. Some scenes were pretty awesome, Darrow throwing down the gauntlet at the feast early on and the finale was, yet again, pretty epic. Some of the twists were cool too.

Some had no foreshadowing at all and just plopped into the plot out of nowhere. There was plenty of internal conflict for Darrow though, as I hoped there would be. His loyalties to home, his new friends, the woman he loves, the society he wants to save all clashing against what he needs to do in order to remake the world.

Is there a Harry Potter version of Cards Against Humanity?

I just wish I'd felt it a little more keenly. The book definitely sagged in the middle but I was ultimately glad that I kept going to the end and I will read the last one in the trilogy.

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